Tag Archives: Turmeric

Spicy Crab Curry – True Indian Style

By Tahira

crabs-11 Seafood, considered a delicacy worldwide has to be included in my diet especially during winters. Though I have never tried having the squeaky octopus (which I want to, of course), edibles, like pomfrets, squids, snails, crabs have never missed my culinary palette.

Last winter, I went home to spend Christmas with my family. Holidays make me crave for more such delicacies. This time I was determined to have crabs. Winters are the best time to have these crustaceans as they are full of meat – juicy and succulent. So, without wasting one Saturday morning I rushed to the local fish market and bought 1 kilo crabs (yes you can buy crabs from a fish market.

Cleaning these crustaceans can be a daunting task if you are doing it for the first time. Nonetheless, after achieving the feat I finally ended up concocting this seafood delicacy in the kitchen. Here’s the recipe. Hope you enjoy it!

Crab-Curry-IndianIngredients

  • 6 nos big size crabs
  • ¼ cup ginger-garlic paste
  • ½ cup tomato puree
  • ¼ cup curd
  • ¼ cup onion paste
  • few whole garam masala
  • 2 tsp garam masala powder
  • 2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 tsp red chilli powder
  • 2 tsp whole jeera
  • 4 nos bay leaf
  • Salt according to taste
  • ½ cup fresh coriander chop
  • ½ cup oil

Method

Wash and clean crabs thoroughly. Boil them in a heavy bottomed pan and keep aside. Heat cooking oil in a pan. Now put whole jeera, bay leaf and whole garam masala. Also, put all other masalas and fry it for few minutes until oil removes from pan. Now put crab and mix with all masalas. Add water and allow it to boil. Keep it covered for 10 minutes on a slow flame.

Garnish it with fresh coriander and serve hot.

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Simple Grilled Pomfret

By Tahira

pomfret 1

Bengalis love fish. True. So being a true blue bong, there was no reason as to why should I not drool over this aquatic creature. I love all kinds of fish – be it the royal hilsa, or the humble rui or pomfret – direct from the sea. Back home for my holidays (that stretched for nearly 3 months) I would often concoct up fishy delicacies in the kitchen.

Most of the time, I cooked pomfret. One of my favourites. So, just thought of sharing the recipe of this delicacy with my readers. Its simple, easy and definitely lip-smacking.

pomfret 2Ingredients

  • ŸPomfret – 2 medium-sized
  • ŸGinger paste
  • ŸGarlic paste
  • ŸRed chilli powder
  • ŸTurmeric
  • ŸYogurt
  • ŸLemon juice
  • ŸSalt to taste
  • ŸCooking oil 1 tablespoon

Method

Wash and pat dry the fish. Make deep slits on each side. Rub lemon juice and ginger-garlic paste on the fish and keep aside for at least minutes. In a bowl make a smooth paste with yogurt, turmeric, red chilli powder, oil and some salt. Apply this paste evenly over the fish. Marinate it for at least two hours. Pre-heat oven and place the marinated fish. Cook for around 20 minutes at 180 degrees. You may apply some butter for basting while cooking. Serve hot with onion slices and lemon wedges.

Masor Tenga – Assameese Fish Curry

By Tahira

masor tenga

Being born and brought up in Bengal, my interaction with the other Indian communities had been quite limited. However, once I shifted to Delhi, my first roommates were an Assameese and a Punjabi. That was my first major stint with communities belonging to other parts of India. I was quite perplexed and excited at the same time. Wondering how would I gel with them and also looking forward to a newly learning experience – getting to know people from various cultures and regions.

So, it was from Sanchayita (S) that I got to know a lot about not only Assameese culture but also their food habits. Being a hardcore non-vegetarian she enjoyed almost every delicacy – from fish to chicken – and from pork to pigeons. Every time I wanted to have  non-veg she would be my partner-in-crime (the PG accommodation offered vegan food). So, one fine day she took me to Mukherjee Nagar where I tasted Assameese cuisine for the first time. Geographical closeness definitely has its impact on the cuisine. It reminded of my home especially the tangy taste of Masor Tenga.

Since then I have tasted many a dish peculiar to the north-eastern part of our country. But, the simple tangy Masor Tenga score above all.  This post is definitely dedicated to S and my other friends from Assam

PS: Natives from Assam, you may put in your signature touch to this recipe as most of it have been collected from memory.

Here’s the recipe.

rohuIngredients

  • Fish (rohu/carp) 500 grams cut into medium-sized pieces
  • ŸTomatoes 2 large, sliced
  • ŸMustard seeds, a handful
  • ŸGreen Chillies, 2-3 slit lengthwise
  • ŸLemon (juice of half or 1 full lemon)
  • ŸTurmeric
  • ŸSalt to taste
  • ŸMustard Oil, 4 tablespoons

Method

Marinate fish pieces with salt and turmeric for at least 30 minutes. In a wok heat 3 tablespoons of mustard oil and fry the marinated pieces. Keep aside. In the same wok, add the rest of the oil and throw in the mustard seeds. Once they began to splutter, add green chillies and the tomatoes. Stir for two-three minutes and then sprinkle some salt. Adding salt after the tomatoes will help the tomatoes to become tender thus enabling you to make a pulp. Add turmeric, stir for a minute and then add some water. You can add some salt at this stage depending upon your taste. Keep stirring for a few minutes and then add the pieces of fried fish. Cook for some time on low flame. Drizzle the required amount of lemon juice (depends how tangy you want it to be), bring to a boil.

The gravy should be a runny curry or jool as Assameese call it. So make sure the quantity of water you add. Remove from gas. Serve hot with boiled rice.