Tag Archives: Bharatiya Janata Party

The Youth Pulse: Talking to Mr. Rajesh Kumar, Youth BJP Leader From Bihar

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By Ankush Kumar

MSK and Ankush Kumar start a series of interviews, where we will showcase the views of our youth leaders and their connect with the Youngistaan.

Joining us today is ‘Mr. Rajesh Kumar’ convenor of the professional cell of the BJP for Bihar. He is a son of the soil, born in a village named Narhat, has done his schooling from there, did his engineering in Bangalore and MBA from Pune. He is currently the Zonal head for Frontline, a company that is into trading and investments. He also has other business interests but most importantly is an active youth leader for the BJP in Bihar.

Excerpts.

Ankush Kumar (AK):  Sir why did you choose the BJP and say no to the Congress or any other political party?

Rajesh Kumar (RK): The motto of this party is to work with a difference. It puts the nation as top priority, then the state follows and self is given least priority. They function in a democratic way, unlike the Congress where one family controls its policies. Hence I have chosen the BJP.

AK:  Since you believe in the democratic set up of your party, and the youth is desperate for change. How do you think you can sync your ideologies with the young voters?

RK: The youth has taken to the social media in a big way, any issue and every issue is dissected by them. They are disheartened by the current affairs of our country and its leaders. We as youth leaders want them to know that we empathize with them and we are ready to walk hand-in-hand and bring change to society.

AK: All political leaders say the same thing sir that they will bring in the change. Frankly most leaders choose politics to make money. How do you think this can change?

RK: I agree to a certain extent that most leaders have failed the people of India; they have minted money on people’s misery. But most importantly they have filled their coffers by dividing the nation on communal and caste lines. These leaders can never show us the right direction. They can just do minority vote bank politics. Our NDA Government in has Bihar managed to change that in the last nine years. We have ensured that people in the lowest strata of the society get educated. Because a well educated society can only curb the rampant culture of such selfish leaders.

AK: As you said that we need to educate at the grass root level, India spends very little on elementary education. What steps has the BJP youth wing taken to ensure that education reaches the grassroots level?

RK: As they say Rome was not built in a day. When NDA came to power in Bihar, our aim first was to eradicate the fear of the people by providing security and law and order. We youth level leaders first want to break the syndicate of these selfish politicians who do not let the weaker sections of society to progress. If you remember the induction of 2 lakh teachers happened during our regime. Cycles were provided to girl students to strengthen our education system.

AK: Last time I visited a few schools in Bihar and most teachers under the Shiksha Mitra scheme did not know basic general knowledge about our country. All this eventually hampers the image of Bihar. Even today the perception of a Bihari is wrong in other parts of India. How do you all plan to tackle this?

RK: See there will be some loopholes always. Even we have observed that selection of few teachers have not been up to the mark. And that definitely needs to be corrected. As far as perception is concerned, I don’t care what others think about us, because we too have opinions on them. For example, I believe Maharashtra has the highest crime rate. Furthermore, Maharashtrians haven’t remained in touch with their culture. So, before throwing stones at us, they need to get their own house in order. We are a state that boasts of the best brains, be it from the field of engineering, UPSC or any other. So you cannot judge us uni-dimensionally.

AK: The bitter truth though remains that these brains eventually settle outside Bihar. What steps can be taken to ensure that brain drain does not happen?

RK: Yes that is true! In fact, I too completed Masters from Karnataka. The truth is that the government of Bihar during the nineties in did zilch development. We had neither engineering nor medical colleges, nor infrastructure – no one was ready to invest here hence the intelligent minds decided to migrate. In the last nine years though people have come forward and through public and private ventures medical colleges are opening in the state. IIT came here so did AIIMS. When we came to power our first priority was law and order and once that was achieved we started focusing on other sectors.

AK: As you said your top priority was law and order, but in the past few months Bihar has witnessed terror crimes. How and why did this happen?

RK: Ever since we have split with the JDU, they have only been interested in saving their government. They focus on ways to demean us and harp on NDA’s achievements. The National security agencies had warned them of threats yet no action was taken. It’s a total failure of the state intelligence machinery. Bihar has hardly seen terror attacks based on communal lines, but these people sitting in Pakistan don’t seem to improve.

AK: I disagree here, terror has no face, innocent lives are lost be it any religion. Doesn’t this statement sends out a wrong message to the youth?

RK: Who says terror has no face? Ask a child on the road and he will tell you terror means Pakistan. Yes, I agree innocent people have nothing to do with these terrorists. But these cowards have repeatedly damaged our nation and its time we retaliate in the most appropriate manner.

AK: Elections are round the corner and social media gives the impression that Narendra Modi is going to become the next Prime Minister. It’s being tipped as a battle between Rahul Gandhi and Narendra Modi. What is your take on it?

RK: I would like to start with a proverb we use in our villages ‘kahan raja bhog kahan gangu teli’. Narendra Ji has been in active politics for the last forty years, thrice the awaam of Gujarat have made him the Chief Minister. He comes from the grass root level, whereas Rahul Gandhi, apart from his family, has no credentials.

He returns from abroad and is made secretary overnight. Wherever he has campaigned, the Congress has lost. He went to UP and they were reduced to 36 seats, he came to Bihar as the icon of the Congress and made false promises. What happened? They won just three seats. So those people who are comparing him to Narendra bhai have very little knowledge about politics.

AK: Sir as you say NaMo is incomparable to any leader, then why is there so much infighting in the BJP over his nomination for PM post?

RK: See, we are a democratic party; in our set-up everyone has the right to express his or her views and opinions. We don’t have unilateral power centers like the others; we have a system in place, where even a cadre-based leader can voice his opinion and if his demands are genuine, it will be acted upon. Families do not run us. I will give you an example here. Do you know the name of the father of Narendra Modi or Rajnath Ji? But the country knows the name of Rahul Gandhi’s father or Laloo’s son or Mulayam Singh Yadav’s family.

AK: As you said you are a democratic party, then why did your parliamentary board gag Shatrughan Sinha? Once gagging happens how is the party democratic?

RK: I am a son of the soil, likewise Shotgunjee too is. He commented on NaMo on the basis of ideologies and understanding of politics. I don’t want to comment on that. But I would like to say that before he comments on Narendra bhai he should gauge his own popularity. In his own constituency his banners were removed and NaMo’s banners were put up. We too have done our surveys and we believe the nation is with Narendra bhai hence he should and will be the man who will lead us in the next elections.

AK: Sir, if you all are so confident, why has his name not been nominated for the top post?

RK: As I said, we are a democratic party, and we function step by step. Right now teams are being formed in different states. Who will lead our campaigns in which state, who will handle what responsibilities. Once we complete the nitty gritties of the campaign we will soon announce the name of Narendra Modi jee as our Prime ministerial candidate.

AK: What is that one issue, that you think will help you regain control of Delhi?

RK: The issue of development is that issue. The youth wants change today, we still are using the same infrastructure that we used forty years back, that needs to change, we want to do politics of development. We are not interested in politics of religion or states or division. We have had enough of this. My appeal to the voters is to go by the appeal of Narendra bhai ‘Yes We Can’. Lets vote for change, let’s vote for development.

AK: Before I take your leave, one final question ‘ where do we see Rajesh Kumar’ in five years time?

RK: I want to live amongst my society, work for them, help them grow in life. Place me anywhere without any selfish reasons because I want to work for the betterment of my nation, state and system.

This was Mr. Rajesh Kumar, a rising star of the BJP from Bihar. Keep a tab on this space online for yet another youth leaders take on the Youth’s pulse. Till then signing off!

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When Raju Lost Faith in Ganga…

By Ankit Chandra

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Remember that movie starring Raj Kapoor, ‘Jis desh mein ganga behti hai’ ? Raj kapoor played the role of a guy from I think Banaras, and goes on to use his sanskar and values to transform a group of dacoits. I think the assumption in the movie was that Raju had complete faith in the values of the mother land.

Cut to Champaign in US. I have met a lot of NRIs here. Some have no traces of India in them, some still have a very thick Indian accent, some dress in ways you wouldn’t imagine on Indians, and then on the other hand you would have people dressed in Salwar kameez, but as soon as they open their mouth, you get amazed at the American accent that hits your ears.

It is interesting to interact with these people, as they aren’t Indians anymore, but thats what they identified as, or they identify themselves as (when they have nothing Indian in them). So in a restaurant, you would hear an Indian American talking to her American friends talking about Aishwarya Rai and saying that Indian people have beautiful names, and that Aishwarya Rai has a portugese ancestory, as Indians don’t have the genes for such beautiful green eyes… Or I heard another NRI in a party saying that Indian people gang up against NRIs coz they are rich and if your car hits a person in India, they would get after you, coz you are a rich NRI and thus you should be punished for that.

I wondered, what was the reason for these people to leave India and come to US… Was it the land of opportunities, or was it something else? I was going for an interview to a Multinational company in a city in US, and my cab driver was an Indian. he said to me : ‘Hope that you are interviewed by a white guy. if you get an Indian, he might ask you for money to let you in…’. Oh my God! I thought. I knew thats so not true, but that exposed me to another perception of India, that I have mostly been unaware of. That of a very common man, who still undergoes a very torturous life of subsistence living, where bribery is still the order of the day, and you have to fight for basic amenities. Indians here are either the most prosperous immigrants who live in Silicon valley or they are these poor Indians who couldn’t find a place for themselves in India. Probably most of you who would read this blog from India , would invariably have come from backgrounds where we have either shut out the ugly side of India, or have created a comfort zone around it.

So why do people leave their own home country to come to such a culturally diverse land where you are mostly cut off from the main stream? I could come up with a few reasons, but this is NOT an exhaustive list by any means….

Lost faith:

One of the people I know here lost his home to a tenant, went to the courts, got nothing done for years, and then had to accept an out of court settlement, finally paid money to the tenant to vacate his house. In his words, there is no ‘enforcement agency in India’. Every time I talk to him about India, I can see his hurt face. The face of a man who expected his environment to provide him with a decent living standard. Most of his words seethe with a latent anger towards the system. He got a chance to get rid of it, and he did. He lives a modest and comfortable life here.

Never had faith:

Some people here came coz they always believed that India wasn’t a place for them. They prolly pick up the foreign accent most easily, curse India in everything they see, and eventually become the worst ambassadors for us. I have met these people in parties here, who would narrate their stories in India, when surprisingly all things that happen to them are bad things, and seemingly they find nothing bad in their current country of residence. (I can point out a few right here).

A special third category:

Is of the people who were born here, but were forced to remain Indian at home, and then left out in the open foreign air to convert into what we call ABCDs. These are a very special variety. Some of them would wear salwars and shirts which were in fashion maybe 20 years back, and when you see them, you would think they have just come in from a remote small town in India. But as they open their mouths, they spew out American english, with ‘Oh my GAAWDs’, ‘This is soo kewwool’ etc etc.

To a person I met recently, I had to say that India she knows and India that I come from are two entirely different countries! These people evaluate their India trip from the American perspective. So Mumbai trains are ‘Sow ppphackked’. And that you have to get into a local train while it is running! (Can’t you wait till it stops or till you get accustomed to it??). They are scared of lizards, and almost all lizards fall on them when they are in India (maybe coz they are NRIs and lizards want to punish the rich NRIs), and so on…

Some of the things that happened to them are real, and maybe, as Indians, we are just used to them. I was just reading the article in the Economist : “What’s holding India Back”, and the reasons mentioned there were pretty much on the above lines. I agree there still are differences in the standard of living here for an common man vs his counterpart in India. Maybe studying these NRIs gives us another perspective of what we need to change in our system to restore the faith Raju had in Ganga…

You Can’t Exist. It Offends ‘Us’

By Ankit Chandra

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In the news today, among other more immediately critical things, is this news about a paintings exhibition in Bangalore (http://www.ndtv.com/article/cities/in-bangalore-moral-policing-means-three-paintings-face-the-wall-326900?pfrom=home-otherstories).

What’s the big deal about a paintings exhibition? Isn’t it just about some people only putting their expressions on to some canvas? who has time for that right? To be quite honest, I think it would be a big deal when a painting exhibition was actually not a big deal. Sadly, we are not there yet.

So what happened was that in this paintings exhibition, there were some paintings showing a few Hindu Goddesses in the nude. A local BJP ‘leader’ walks in and sees these paintings and flips out. He ensures that those paintings be put inside out, so that no one can see them. He said “I have reported to chief coordinator of Chitrakala Parishat saying you people should not show like this, Hindu gods and all. We have our own belief, we have our own culture…”

When I read this, I had a mixture of feelings inside me. Besides the obvious questions like ‘who the hell is he to be the representative of Hinduism’ (I am sure Lord Ram didn’t send him an appointment letter, because I think God likes me more than this BJP leader), I was more anxious because I see a special type of slow rape and murder happening here. That of freedom. Not only of speech, but to exist freely. Given that this rape of freedom a slow process, I am sure the government wouldn’t care to fix this, as this doesn’t affect the elections in 2014, or the local Karanataka elections, whenever they are held.

This is an urgent problem. Not only in Karnataka, but in Tamil Nadu with Viswaroopam, or with the late M.F. Hussain, or with the painters in Ahmedabad whose exhibition was vandalized, or with Deepa Mehta for making Water. The list goes on. And this list scratches our faces with its iron finger nails telling us that you must live in servitude of those who can walk over you whenever they feel like.

Anyway, back to the news. The father of the painter issued a statement: “There is absolutely nothing objectionable in his paintings. If that is so, then all temples should be destroyed.” After reading this statement, I had another mixture of feelings ride inside me. One of which was that of desperation. You see, in the older times people seemed to have more freedom of expression. They ‘could’ sculpt Hindu Goddesses in the nude. And those sculptures were integrated into temples. In 2013, we have regressed to a time even before them. Maybe stone ages where the whims of a petty local politician were taken to be a decree more critical than the dreams of Rabindranath Tagore.

Of course we could not have one more than one Nobel in literature. For that, we’d need to coexist in this century first…

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NaMo – Armed With All the Ammo!!

Popularity. Power. People. A change for betterment or worse? Dwaipayan Chakraborty ponders over this issue while taking us through Narendra Modi’s political career.

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Mr. Modi gave his final touches before the last lap towards Race 2014 by visiting his seniors, Mr.Advani and Vajpayeeji to convey his regards. He is now ready to single-handedly lead the BJP (some traces of NDA) towards forming the government in the next five years.

If you take one look at Mr.Modi’s journey, it would surely be regarded as a remarkable event. Beginning as an aggressive leader, staunch follower of the Hindutava ideology, he faced his major setback in the Gujarat riots, which still haunts him. Yet he has left that behind, and come a long way from being almost shown out from the party to the leader of the national election campaign. Let’s observe the current scenario, Mr. Advani, the senior most and the most probable person for the Prime Ministerial candidate has accepted that he no longer has a chance. NDA partner JD(U)’s Nitish Kumar, ending the 17-year long alliance along with any hope his being the leader. Other BJP leaders, some in support and some against have readily taken it for granted that if NDA wins, Modi will be at the helm of matters. So, any internal collision has been washed away. Now what stands between Modi and his being PM is the opposition. But even he knows that battle is relatively easier than any internal feud.

An able administrator does not always have a lot of friends. He is supposed to think the greater good and make decisions which might not be acceptable to everyone, but the majority. He starts off as a trainee, in this case a Sevak and scales the height gradually, falling / rising, but never stopping & most importantly waiting for the right moment to strike his dominance. Being at the top is never easy, one must toil out his skin and keep hoping for good luck.

The popularity today of Modi is not born out of a fort night; he has done a lot of things right to be here. I agree that he has a major religion-al setback to counter always. His domain is meagre, only one state, yet how many leaders can keep holding on to the mantle repeatedly. Inspirational oratory, industrial developments, youth workforce and loyal followers are some of his forte which has kept him going. Modi wishes to replicate the same on the national scale, though the challenges are greater. But ask any of his followers, and you will get an instant answer “Kyun Nahi Sambhab?”

Politically, the UPA look stronger on paper, after NDA losing its strong hold down south recently. The Prince has done a cabinet reshuffle to gear up things against their only significant rival, the NDA. Now after clearing all the internal dilemmas/ egos Modi stands alone. The stage could not have been better for him; he is unofficially the leader to decide whatever is right for NDA in order to come in governance. But his supports are weaker now, NDA alliance shaky, and some internal leaders not happy with his rise being a few of the cases he needs to tackle. Modi has to formulate an innovative strategy in order to win over the hearts of a billion. Already he has been assisted by UPA’s scam ridden regime and their inability to decide the upcoming leader.

After all, if someone puts his ears deep into the minority sections of Gujarat, one can understand the grievance they have against Narendra. They still believe he cannot be a good secular leader and has his inclination. Somehow 2002 cannot be wiped off from their memory. India is a vast country and the so called minority class isn’t a minority anymore. Modi has to deal with this too.

Popularity is the strongest Ammo in NaMo’s armour.

But is that enough to lead a country? Numbers will have the final say.

Pati Patni Aur Woh In The Bihar Political Drama

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Our Political Analyst from Bihar analyses the situation in the state referencing it with frequent marriages and divorces in the Indian Political arena. A must read where he mentions no matter what the equations become, the only loser would be the state and the people of Bihar. 

“Marriage is like a deck of cards. In the beginning all you need is two hearts and a diamond. In divorce though, a club and a spade would have been better”. This how relationships begin and when the going gets tough, the tough decides to fizzle out. In the last seventy two hours the Indian political class has seen a bitter divorce that has taken place. A formidable marriage between the BJP & JD (U) has finally gone kaput.

In the last seventeen years both these parties made their voters believe ‘they cannot live without each other’. Kept each other’s secrets close to their chest, both of them covered each other’s lies, they had their voters hypnotized by their actions and today out of the blue they tell the world that ‘we are sorry, we were wrong, we can live without each other’.

Day before yesterday the rains ruined an India v/s Pakistan classic, but yesterday was Super Sunday in Bihar politics. As the news started to trickle in that the marriage is over the entire city of Patna wore a deserted look. Normally the eateries do roaring business here on the weekends, but the voters had already been given enough food for thought to keep their stomachs full through the night.

The fear of a certain mister Laloo Prasad Yadav winning the next assembly elections came back to haunt the business community yesterday. The young entrepreneurs who came back to the city in the last seven years and pumped in money to establish their settlements feared for the worse in the coming time.

What hurt the people was the fact that a state that was once considered a liability had become an asset in such a short span of time, a government that won the last assembly elections purely on the issue of development had chosen to betray the faith of their people over the secular v/s communal divide.

The other woman in the relationship was waiting to take advantage of the divide. Congress had been sending feelers to JDU for the past two years now. What the two partners failed to realise was that every marriage goes through problems; there are times when both face ideological differences, both have an ego tussle ensuing, but at the end of the day, the alliance was not just about them, it was also about their loved ones; their voters. The problem is when JDU realised it had a cushion to fall back on, they had stopped caring about the relationship.

What unfolds in the near future is something only the clock will decide, but one thing is sure, the jolted voters will answer this step in the next general elections. Either ways whoever forms the government at the centre ‘BIHAR & ITS PEOPLE STAND TO LOSE’.

P.S: BJP is saying to the Congress ‘Honey you can have him’. We deserve better!

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