Category Archives: Recruitment

Do You Have a Mobile Strategy to Hire Candidates?

Rahul Krishna, Manager Talent Acquisition Group at Espire Infolabs talks about a mobile strategy to hire candidates to empower employees by a cloud referral system! Also talks about opening a new source to get candidates other than the job boards.

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A Mobile phone can be a potential source to recruit top talent in your organizations. We have all the major job boards & application on our phones and this improves the candidate’s user experience to apply as you see.

There can be application acting as a referral system which empower the recruiters and open a new gate to get those referred resumes which are not present on a job board. It’s quite important to realize that the referred candidate has higher chances to qualify and join the organization as we have an employee who has referred that candidate. We are connecting to the web and corporate recruiters must understand and learn the uptrends of the market. We need to integrate a mobile application with the career website which will open a window to refer candidates

As you read further in the article we will explore the techniques for hiring talent globally & also participating in the Mobile uprising for convenience, with a click of a button which is handy enough for you.

Make this application available on the cloud, get this application to your employees; this will enable them to refer when they are not at work. Your employees will make a difference and the employees who do not refer they will also start using it as this is available on the smartphone. They have an independence to make a request and share the contact number, name and email address, a resume can be given at a later point of time. In this manner your employees have all the job opportunities of in their handheld, so it is easy for them to check with their old colleagues/friends and enable them and giving a chance to work with them. Also in this referral system we can prioritize the urgency of the position to get filled as we are hiring all billable resources and it involves a lot of money.

We may not be in front of our computer however we are always available on phone. Let’s try to be on the mobile to hire best talent globally through a referral system, giving confidence and opening a gate to your employees to participate in their company growth.

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Are You a Good Boss or a Bad One?

Gurulakshmi Iyer- Hait strongly believes that employees don’t leave jobs, they leave their managers! To this end, she delves a little into the quality that makes a person a good boss or a bad one. 

Conflict

If you think your teacher is tough, wait until you get a boss. He doesn’t have tenure.
Bill Gates

bill-gates“Boss Calling” flashes on our cells and we jump out of our seats to answer the call. None of us are leading an absolutely free life – either we manage others or we are being managed by others. Simply put, either we boss around or are being bossed by someone else. Since subordinates mimic every move of their bosses, it is very important for managers to keep this in mind. Their work profile includes not only to projection of power but also setting a particular path for their subordinates to follow.

Do Bosses and Their Behavior Matter?

According to a study, the average boss adds about 1.75 times as much output as the average worker. The culture of any organization percolates from its top management. The style of leadership followed in an organization starts from the CEO’s office. The ripple effect of the leader’s style either helps in bolstering or undermining the cultures and performance levels.

A few years back, I had attended a Culture Building Programme. One of the exercises in the Programme involved collecting feedback of co-workers. Surprisingly, 65% of the feedback offered was for managers! It’s then that I realized the Halo effect. Employees give prominence to certain trait in their bosses and the whole evaluation in the employees’ mind happen on the basis of that. Every move, every decision of a boss is mimicked and scrutinized on such trait and yes, bosses really do matter.

leadership-skillsThe best bosses work relentlessly and use their power to their advantage. They control the organizational performance by tuning in to the people. Bosses who fail to do so not only make their lives hell but also ruin the peace and happiness of their subordinates. Almost 90% of attrition is directly or indirectly because of lousy bosses. People adjust to any moods and moves, but not to impossible bosses.

James Meindl’s research on “the romance of leadership” shows that the leaders get far more credit and blame than they deserve. If you are a leader in your organization, this is a part and parcel of your life.

If as a boss, you aren’t able to present negative feedback as constructive criticism, you are bound to spoil the morale of your subordinates and ruin their desire to work with you. At the end of the day, it’s your work that will suffer!

“Know how to project power, since those you lead need to believe you”.

Bob Sutton,Stanford Management Professor

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Salary Negotiations – Recruiters Pride – Part 2

Business meeting

In this second part of his article Rahul Krishna, Manager – Talent Acquisition at Espire Infolabs, talks of the other four components of a successful salary negotiation for an HR professional. Read, learn, grow.

1. Present the offer as a total reward package

When making the offer, present it as an itemized total reward package so people can see the true value of what is being offered to them. So, include: salary, size of any bonus, size of any retirement fund with monetary value of contribution, plus value of any health insurance premium value, number of vacation days, company car value, personal training budget, etc. Also, itemize any non monetary perks like flexible working and casual dress code.

2. Leave some negotiation room in your offer

Research shows that most managers tend to leave some negotiation room in their offer. This is not necessarily the same as ‘shooting low’, because if you make too low an offer, a candidate can be insulted and you might force him/her into driving a harder bargain than intended. Always make a fair offer based on their current salary, their need for advancement and market expectations; but leave enough room to negotiate. Don’t forget, many people like to negotiate and see it as part of a relationship building process.

3. Rebuttals

If an employee refuses your offer and requests a higher salary, ask them what their expectation is and ask them to provide economic evidence for their position. Also, ask them to detail their past achievements and likely contributions to justify their requested starting salary. This is a strong defensive play, which firmly pushes the ball back into their court. Who knows, they may persuade you they are worth it, or they may be forced into a reality check, which could make them more accommodating.

4. Bargaining tools

You should also have an array of bargaining tools—based on your accumulated knowledge of the candidate—at your disposal that you can offer in exchange for salary. For example, perhaps the option of working from home, or a compressed week may be more attractive to your candidate in preference for salary. Perhaps you could make pay raises conditional based on achieving agreed performance goals. You could enhance their bonus. There are many other options available to you in the event that the candidate rejects your initial offer.

There is no magic formula for handling a salary-negotiation, but I hope you can see there are steps you can take to perform more effective salary negotiations more of the time. A well thought out negotiating and closing process is critical to your success!

salary-negotiation-tips

Salary Negotiations – Recruiters Pride – Part 1

salary cover

One of the key stages of the hiring process is the starting salary negotiation. It is a hurdle that needs to be overcome if you are to close the deal on your dream candidate. While there is no magic formula for handling a salary negotiation—as it can be impacted by many external factors beyond your control—there are several tactics to follow that can help you to engage in a mutually beneficial and ultimately successful salary negotiation.

Rahul Krishna, Manager – Talent Acquisition Group Espire Infolabs advices on the subject in the first part of this two-part series.

1. Put the salary range in the job description

There is a general reluctance for employers to include salary details in the job description, but by failing to do this, you are making salary negotiations harder as you are not setting the candidate expectations correctly and you may attract candidates who are off the scale. Where possible, include a range, even if it is broad, and make it clear that the candidate’s actual pay will be dependent on their experience and likely contribution to the business. This way you will filter out those candidates who are out of the ball park and where salary negotiations are likely to be fruitless — and a potential waste of both party’s time.

2. Check whether you are in the same ball park

There can be a tendency for the candidate and hiring manager to negotiate according to poker rules and not show their hand early, which means salary expectations, may not be revealed until late in the process. This can lead to salary negotiation issues if the candidate and employer salary expectations prove to be wide apart or not in the same ball park. At the very least, ask the candidate to confirm their current salary and package, so you can check you are on the same page and save wasting each other’s time.

3. Give additional reasons to join you, other than just money

Don’t allow the candidate to become too fixated on salary; give them other reasons to join you by constantly promoting all the other positive perks and aspects of working at the business, be that: culture, training, challenging work, location, benefits, flexible working, etc. The candidate will factor in all these perks and may be prepared to accept a lower salary in the knowledge that he/she will be receiving all these great perks.

4. Make the offer face-to-face

Where possible, try handing over the offer letter face-to-face and then talk them through it, rather than by post or email. It’s much easier to reject or query an offer that has come via email, or letter as it is quite impersonal. So, personalize and make the offer face-to-face and this should give you the upper hand. Of course, the candidate should still be given a few days to make up his/her mind, if need be.

Wait for the next set of guidelines in my next post.

salary-negotiation-tips

Next Gen HR Mantra – Competency Based Approach

Business people crossing finish line

By Gurulakshmi Iyer-Hait

Dramatic growth will take place when we focus on the organization-with technology a part – rather than on technology alone.

-C.K.Prahlad

As a HR professional in a knowledge and tech based organization, when I had to frame a model for the annual appraisal process, I was surprised to see a paradigm shift by the top management. Instead of evaluating what is achieved, there has been a shift in the method to it being how it is achieved. Such competencies actually develop when multiple technologies are harmonized. Knowledge in most organizations is held by people. What is more difficult to identify are managerial competencies. Research shows leveraging on managerial competencies clubbed with efficient organization management can give an organization a competitive edge. So the framework basically comprised of managerial competencies.

It is expected of a manager to react to constant business changes in internal and external environment. Hence it has become a challenge for the HR to identify the managerial competencies. The biggest benefit of such approach is that it focuses on a specific employee and not the work position and does not comply with the HR policy. Hence not only training and development has to be taken care of, but also the career development factor is taken care of in this approach. This in turn also complies to the Maslow’s law of Hierarchy.

While I was working there, we had developed a model in connection with the organizational values rather than individual work positions. The model really helped in enabling to identify, measure and evaluate competencies within the organization. However every organization has their own models and there is no common consensus in regard to what framework should be followed.

According to Lucia and Lepsinger, certain competencies might be generic across several organizations but behaviors relating to those competencies vary widely from organization to organization. Hence in this approach it is the employees who are an important source for achieving a competitive edge to the organization.

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HR – Support Function to Strategic Function, the Irrefutable Paradigm Shift

BusinessPartner

Ganesh Subramanian writes on how HR has come a long way from being a support function to a strategic function and why it deserves a lot of importance

HR as a function has come a long way from the days of personnel management to being an integral part of any business strategy. As much as this awareness among the business community is pleasing, it is equally depressing to see that still a vast majority of people, be it employees or businesses, view HR as a function that doesn’t deserve respect or importance.

What are the reasons for this incongruent view? The blame is to be equally shared between the practitioners of HR and the working population. In a lot of companies, especially the smaller ones, there is usually a single department that takes care of HR & Administration. What this does is blurs the distinction between HR and admin and for an average employee both of them are one and the same.

A HR is expected to repair a fan or mend a creaking chair in the same vein in which he/she does performance appraisal or recruits an employee. The employees who act as if they are apostles of good behaviour during the interview look down upon the HR. Everything is blamed on the HR, right from miniscule salary increments to lack of holidays to uninteresting work.

On the other side, HR in mediocre companies immerse themselves in sub-functions like recruitment and performance appraisals and strive hard to conform to metrics. They end up doing mundane run-of-the-mill jobs losing sight of important HR functions like career planning, employee engagement, etc.

From a labour function in early days, HR has moved on to be a business partner and then to being viewed as a strategic partner. Good companies have recognised the value of making their people function a part of key decisions. These companies are smart enough to realise that business decisions of the future need to be made keeping in mind the human aspect. The recruitment team in these companies understand the business very well and ensure that the job-person fit is tailor-made.

It is a well known fact that most of the CEOs have their hands full dealing with people issues in their career. As one goes up the corporate ladder, a business problem always manifests itself as a people related issue. It is obvious that managing people is the most challenging task that companies and specifically HR have to grapple with. A same marketing strategy can make 100 products successful and standard revenue targets can make years of annual reports appear better, but no one solution can work when it comes to dealing with people as each human is different.

Let us start recognising HR as an important part of a company wheel and give it and the people who are involved in it their due respect.

Finding the right talent

The Recruitment Conundrum: Talent Crunch vs Unspotted Talent

Finding the right talent

 

Ganesh Subramanian talks of the current problems in recruitment strategies of companies and gives solutions for improvement. A must read for all HR professionals

Come the recruitment season, every year we see HRs of companies doing their best to bring talent on-board by various means – be it through conducting walk-ins, be it visiting campuses for hiring or through job portals or consultant tie-ups. They leave no stone unturned in enriching the talent pool of their company and striving to achieve the senior management’s mandate of a target headcount by the end of the year.

There is no doubt that the HRs head to some of the best technical and management schools in the country where they find the brightest minds on display, the crème-de-la-crème. While all this give an impression that they are able to successfully fulfil the talent requirements of the company, the picture is far from rosy. Grappling with attrition, misfit in roles and a host of other problems, HRs are left complaining about talent crunch at the end of the day. Recruitment is done in bulk and still there is a talent crunch. Why this paradox? Is there a way out?

Some of the companies accredit technical colleges and B-schools where they go for campus recruitment every year. While this is a win-win situation with the B-school/technical college having the chosen company visit their campus every year, the company also has access to the best of the talent. However, this policy also has a small inherent flaw in itself.

By restricting the number of institutions that they hire from, companies lose out on unspotted talents untouched by opportunities. The only fault of the student from such colleges is that their institution is not accredited by some company for campus recruitment. While this does not call for companies to change their approach radically, they must be flexible enough with their hiring options.

The bottomline is if you input garbage, you get back garbage.

The other reason for the talent crunch is the way in which personal interviews are conducted by companies. Rather than trying to find out the strengths of the candidate and then see how it fits companies requirements, interviews turn out to be one on one (or many to one, as the case may be) gibberish encountered in online chat rooms. Armed as if by rote learning with outdated and irrelevant questions, interviews have the eventual effect of leaving candidates frustrated who wonder how such seemingly stupid questions are relevant to the job position for which they are being interviewed. The bottomline is if you input garbage, you get back garbage.

I will close this discussion with a couple of interesting incidences which I learnt from my friends. In one case, a talented candidate attended an interview for a mid-level role in a reputed company. After having successfully cleared the interview and being orally informed that he is being selected for that role, this person much to his dismay found that his job offer was later rejected only because his institution from where he studied was closed down. This person had to be at the receiving end for no fault of his.

How can the knowledge and experience accumulated over the years vanish in an instant just because a person’s almamater no longer exists? In another case, a person was selected for an entry level position in a support function department in a company. After a week into the job, this person was asked to quit the job by his boss for the silliest reasons ever heard.  The person does not have a smiling face according to some employees.

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The boss said that the person’s performance was not matching expectations and the person’s ambitions will not help him do this job effectively. What more? The boss went on to play God saying that he can easily identify whether the person will be effective or not in a job in just 7 days. Heights of stupidity and baseless arrogance! Finally, this employee was also forced to resign without having a chance to even explain himself.

After learning about these incidents, the clarion call is loud and clear. It is time for the human resource function to take a call. They can either take the lead and be proactive in tackling talent crunch or continue doing the run-of-the-mill routine job and keep complaining.

Exact Person